Tag Archives: George Lewis

More Melancholy, Less Science

A Melancholy Science
at Outpost 186 – November 29th, 2010

Randy Pingrey – trombone
James Wylie – alto sax
Ezra Weller – trumpet

Part 1: The Changing Same
for George Lewis

The Changing Same

The Changing Same

The Changing Same

The Changing Same

The Changing Same

The Changing Same

Part 2: 3 Things I Know about Her
for JLG

She

Thing

Thing

Thing

She

Part 3: Coda

Improvisation for Brian

Shostakovich’s Prelude for Saxophone, Trumpet, and Trombone

It was an incredible honor to share this performance with James and Ezra – they both sound so wonderful.  Their performances are totally amazing: they are both virtuosic instrumentalists and brilliant improvisers.  James and Ezra (if you ever read this): thank you so much!

I really enjoyed this performance, and I’m quite happy to present the entire concert here.  There are a few suggestions I have to the listener for fun, unusual ways to experience this music (other than listening to each track separately, of course):

1) Try listening to all 6 versions of The Changing Same simultaneously.
2) Try listening to all 3 Things at the same time, and compare what you hear to the 2 Shes.  Hopefully they sound similarly to you.
3) Try listening to “Improvisation” and the prelude at the same time.  Unlike the previous two things, they weren’t originally meant to go together, but somehow they do…

I hope you enjoy the music!  Feel free to download the tunes – I think they sound a little better that way (as opposed to streaming) – and share them with all of your friends.  Thank you very much for listening.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Trio

Solo Trombone

There is this tradition of solo trombone improvising.  In Derek Bailey’s book on improvisation:

The most interesting soloists to my ears often turn out to be trombonists.  Paul Rutherford and George Lewis, in their different ways, both seem to make improvisation the basis of their solo playing and also take advantage of the “singleness” of the solo situation; happy for the music to sound like one person, playing alone.     pg.109

Well, that sounds like an interesting thing to explore!  Today, on a whim, I recorded some solo improvisations.

One
Two
Three
Four

I’m working on developing a solo language.  I have to say, it’s challenging for me to improvise all by myself for any extended period of time – I think the longest track is two or three minutes, and most of them are closer to half that.  There are stories about Anthony Braxton and Roscoe Mitchell really focusing on individual details of music in order to extend their improvisations, and I can totally understand why.  My personal favorite is the fourth track, because it has that focus which is lacking in the other three.

I’ve also never quite wrapped my head around what Derek Bailey means by “singleness”, at least in the sense that, desipite working on solo playing for about a year, I have yet to be able to enjoy the emptiness.

Anyways, I’ll continue to work on it.  One person, playing alone.  Thanks for listening!

Leave a comment

Filed under Solo Trombone